Live

We are pleased to be able to offer a live stream of all our seminars in this series.

We are pleased to be able to offer a live stream of all  our seminars in this series.  The stream will  go live five minutes before the presentations are scheduled to begin.  If you wish to ask any questions to the panel, please post your question  in the comments field below.


Live streaming video by Ustream

8 comments

  1. Claire says:

    Interesting that Jonathan says people are looking at laptops when the presentation is showing in the same room. Is it known that they are actually looking at the same PPT slides, or are they doing something else – related or otherwise?

    What does this say about how they see their identity?

    What might the effect of such behaviour be on their F2F and/or online interactions or connections in relation to the learning situation?

    Perhaps this is an embodied version of lurking?

    Many possibilities … interesting

  2. David Longman says:

    Hmm – studies should look at how important or useful information is rather than what seems to be assumed here, i.e. that information is more like the weather, something to coped with. When information is linked to a felt purpose, learning curves change. This should be studied.

  3. bhaveet says:

    Hello all, view the seminars again here and continue your very interesting conversations/discussions – http://breakingboundariesoxford.org/?page_id=37

  4. Dominic Orr says:

    Thank you for the very interesting seminar. I have a comment for the presenters. => On MOOCs vs. OER – The title of the seminar was “OER, MOOCs and the promise of broadening access to education”, but it seems that most of the presentations focused on MOOCs. I wonder if this is natural, since an OER (that is not a MOOC) is just an element in a learning environment, and we know little about the whole learning environment in which the OER is used. Perhaps this is also the reason why it is easier to discuss the effects of MOOCs, since they tend to replace (and transform) a more traditional learning environment in total. But sometimes small changes are easier than big ones, this would seem to be the specific advantage of a lot of OER initiatives over MOOCs – but – as mentioned – it is harder to talk about their effect. Is this a fair assessment of the MOOCs vs. OER quandary?

  5. Maria Perifanou says:

    How successful can be a language MOOC when we have thousands of students of different language level and different needs?

  6. Sarah Porter says:

    A bit belatedly – but thanks Dominic, these are really pertinent comments about the seminar. I think you have captured that part of the debate well – we didn’t talk as much about OER as about MOOCs and I agree that this is partly because it is harder to locate and understand impact. As you say, OER can have a lower ‘cost of entry’ as it can be done on a small scale, and by an individual, whereas this is not usual for a MOOC.

    As new models and different types of MOOCs develop, Small Open Online Courses for example (SOOCs), it will be interesting to see if the cost of access lowers. I’d also really welcome universities (and others) continuing to consider OER as part of their e-learning / TEL strategy and provide support and advice to teachers on OER creation. OER potentially has more long-term impact for sustainable education than MOOCs alone. Perhaps we need to look for a more blended OER / MOOC approach?

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